2019年9月8日日曜日

The History of Tokoname Bonsai Pots


  Japanese bonsai pots were born in Tokoname roughly 150 years ago. Today, the name Tokoname is synonymous with bonsai pottery and well known around the world. Let us explore its history and the accomplishments of our forefathers.

The beginning

       Tokoname City, Aichi Prefecture, is known to be one of Japan’s Six Ancient Kilns. Its pottery-making history dates back nearly 1000 years. Production of earthen jars and pots began in the medieval age, red “Shudei” teapots appeared in the modern period and clay pipes, tiles and toilets have been manufactured since the Meiji Period. As the first bonsai pots in this history, it is said that plant pots for orchids were introduced in the mid-1800s. They were produced in large quantities from the late Edo Period to the Meiji Period, as demonstrated by the large plant pots that appeared at the First National Industrial Exposition in 1877 and more pots from Tokoname exhibited at the exposition several years later. However, that did not mean that Tokoname became the center of bonsai pot production right away. Let us look into the landmark developments that led to its rise.


Meiji Period

        The first development that fanned its growth was the bonsai boom that spread in the early Meiji Period, first from Osaka, then to Tokyo and around the rest of Japan. By the middle of the period, Tokoname pots began to appear as pots made exclusively for bonsai plants. The majority were round pots shaped on the pottery wheel but were soon followed by rectangular pots, chiefly for bonsai use. Due to the popularity of "Deimono*" earthenware pots among bonsai fans, the soil in the area around Tokoname was probably best suited for the clay to making the "Deimono*" bonsai pots.

*Deimono: Unglazed bonsai pot

       At that time, Seto in Aichi Prefecture enjoyed overwhelming popularity for its plant pots. Since the latter part of the Edo Period, Seto provided plant pots in vast quantities to all parts of Japan, offering from elegant, artistic pots to be presented to the homes of feudal lords to affordable pieces for the common people. By the end of the Meiji Period, Seto plant pots began to disappear. Mr. Takashi Furuhashi , a researcher on Seto plant pots, attribute this in part to "Seto pottery in the Meiji Period losing the patronage of the lord of Owari and other feudal lords that it enjoyed in the Edo Period." Although plant pots continued to be made in Seto in the Meiji and later periods, less and less effort was put into the craft in comparison with the quality attained during the Edo Period, leading to a decline in pottery craftsmanship.
Elegant and artistic Seto plant pots of  Edo period. These pots are owned by Mr. Tkashi Furuhashi.


Taisho and Showa periods

        While Seto plant pottery declined, bonsai pottery in Tokoname gained momentum, stirred by demand from bonsai gardeners. By the middle of the Meiji Period, efforts were being directed to reproducing the old Deimono pots of China, regarded as the finest by bonsai aficionados. This diligent work reached fruition with high-quality Deimono beginning to appear in the Taisho and early Showa periods, dubbed "Taisho-toko" by fans. These pots earned the same praise as that directed to the Chinese pots.


      The late Akiji Kataoka (also known as Juoudo-shosen 十王堂 松泉, his professional name as a potter), founded Kataoka Seitosho (later renamed Yama’aki) in 1920 and conducted research into old Chinese pots with great diligence and contributed to the advancement of the quality of Tokoname bonsai pots. The company's reference literature shows that pots from his kilns bore the "Kinka-zoin" impression, a famed ancient Chinese pottery brand, in 1927. Although the seal impression was placed at the request of a wholesaler, it demonstrates that the quality he achieved at that time was already so high that they could not be distinguished from their older Chinese counterparts.
This pot was made by Akiji Kataoka about 100 years ago with "kinka-zoin" impression. This pot is owned by Mr. Tadashi Sekino.


Pre-WWII period

       Although not widely known today, bonsai pot production in Tokoname reached a high in the early Showa period, reportedly peaking in 1932-1936. Under these circumstances, the first national bonsai exhibition, Kokufu-ten, was held in 1934. With the rise in the demand for bonsai, the variety of pots expanded, both in shape and color.  The types of clay included, udei (grey clay), shudei (vermilion clay), shidei (purple clay), kokudei (black clay), and hakudei (white clay). Examples of glazed pots are namako (sea slug), kinyou (sky blue), blue, and white. Shapes also were various, including round, rectangular, oval, hexagonal, octagonal, hanagata (flower-shape), mokkou (Japanese quince), and kengai (cascade style) shapes. The fundamental styles seen in Tokoname today were already established at this time. With the outbreak of WWII, however, bonsai pots, regarded as non-essential to the war effort, disappeared.
It is said that this big pot was made in Tokoname as a fuel tank for Japanese battle planes at WWII. It is displayed at Tokoname Tonomori museum.

Post-WWII period

       Demand for bonsai pots recovered slowly from the 1950s and reached a golden age in the 1970s and 1980s. The post-war bonsai boom accelerated the spread of Tokoname pottery across Japan. In the 1973 breakdown of flower and bonsai pot production centers in Japan, Tokoname ranked at the top with a 50% market share. Despite the subsequent decline in the demand for plant pots, Tokoname continued to enjoy the top share of Japan's bonsai pot market. When Tokoname pottery gained recognition as a traditional craft in 1976, its bonsai pots drew attention as well.

        The potters of bonsai pots during this period engaged in experimentation, including improvements in the clay and the development of new glazes. One such effort was the reproduction of ancient Chinese udei and shidei clays. According to Mr. Katsushi Kataoka (professional name: Reiho), Tokoname bonsai pots were made chiefly with shidei, hakudei and kokudei. There were udei pots but not in the color seen today. His father and fellow potters decided to create the finest udei pots and tested all types of clay found in the Tokoname area. 
Master Katsushi Kataoka, Reiho.
         Glazed pots saw improvements as well, with colors not seen in the prewar days being introduced as glazes. The late Masakazu Shimizu (professional name: Yozan), a prominent master of glazed pots, succeeded in the commercialization of the first cinnabar bonsai pots in Tokoname.

YAMA'AKI

         There is no doubt that Yamaaki, the largest pottery production operation in Tokoname, played a major role in the advancement of bonsai pots from the region. More specifically, its accomplishments were the creation of high-quality products that show sophistication and dignity as bonsai pots in color, texture, shape, etc., as well as their superb functionality as a receptacle for plants, and for paving the way for mass production in factories. Yamaaki founded by Akiji Kataoka in the prewar days opened its new factory in 1971. The giant gas kiln with its capacity for 100-200 large pots was fired 5-6 times a month during the peak period. Although mass-produced, veteran craftsman attended each step of the production process, finishing the product with care and attention. The company also worked on improving pot breathability and reducing weight with the addition of sawdust to the clay.
The huge kiln of YAMA'AKI


Export

          Another point of great importance is that Yamaaki had the foresight to pour energy into sales. According to Mr. Sadamitsu Kataoka (professional name: Koshosen 小松泉), the founder's son, the company has been exporting bonsai pots to other countries since 1950. He said, "I myself went to the United States for a year after graduating from high school (around 1968-1969). Initially, I was able to live in a trading company dormitory in a town near Los Angeles and sold pots to bonsai vendors in America." Their products were exported not only to the United States but also to Europe and even to China via Hong Kong. He believes that Tokoname pots gained global recognition because they were being sold overseas from that time.
Master Sadamitsu Kataoka

Thank you very much for reading this blog post to the end!

2019年8月4日日曜日

The July display of Hanging Scroall and Another Bonsai at Takao-komagino-teien

The project "Displaying Hanging Scroll with Bonsai Every Month" has started at Takao-komagino-teien in Tokyo last April. The purpose is to deepen our understanding of Hanging Scroll and explore how to display beautifully with bonsai.

On July 13, the Japanese paper craft artist, Wakako Ishisone, the bonsai master, Koji Nagasawa and YUKIMONO gathered in the Tokonoma-room of Takao-komagino-teien. Let's see how we display for July. 

東京・八王子市にある高尾駒木野庭園の古民家で、表装造形家・石曽根和佳子(いしそねわかこ)さんの掛軸が飾られています。石曽根さんの作品に魅了されたYUKIMONO主催者のわたくしが、盆栽と一緒に飾ったら来訪者に喜ばれるのではと、同庭園の盆栽管理者である盆栽家・長沢孝二さんにご相談したことから,
2019年の4月に始まりました。月替わりで、古民家内の床の間2カ所に、掛軸と盆栽を飾っています。

7月13日の土曜日、7月の飾りのために3人が集いました。プロジェクトの第3回目です。今回はどんな掛軸と盆栽が新しい空間をつくりだすでしょうか。さっそく拝見していきましょう。(6月の飾りはこちらこちらをご覧くださいませ)


作品1: 扇面軸  Fan

表装に使われているのは、青色が鮮やかな葛布です。江戸時代に使用された裃の布をほどいて仕立てたと、石曾根さん。中心には、きらびきの紙に和歌が筆書きされた、扇面を飾っています。
短歌:
 秋靄(あきもや)や おし年(ね)の蛍 飛(ひ)かふもすかるも おなし影の涼しさ

 蛍の鑑賞時期はいつかご存知でしょうか?各地で異なるようですが、一般的にピークは6・7月のようです。見ごろの時期を過ぎた8月に入っても蛍が飛んでいる、その初秋の様子をこの歌は詠んでいます。

床の間に飾ると、葛布のブルーが鮮やかに見えます。全体でグラデーションがかかった濃淡の違いもあって、たいへんシンプルな掛軸であるのに、美しく、かつ上品な存在感があります。下に、ふんわりとした草物盆栽を添えました。


作品2: カブトムシ軸 Beetle 

カブトムシの墨絵を、質感の異なるさまざまな黒色布でパッチワークのようにあしらった、変わり貼り表具の掛軸です。石曾根さんが、およそ10年前に作ったものです。
全体には黒っぽく見えますが、それぞれの布をよく見ると、一つひとつが異なっています。古代絓(しけ)、紬、黒箔など、質感の独特な古い絹の布を、バランスを考えながら継ぎ合わせて一つの作品に完成させています。すべて明治時代半ば以降の着物に使われた布だそうです。石曾根さんが、表情に違いのある黒い布にこだわったこと、ところどころに白布を効かせたことで、モダンさも感じられるユニークな作品に仕上がっています。

なぜこのように、さまざまな布をしらったのか。「カブト虫の絵だけでは、存在感が弱い気がしたので、この掛軸全体を見ていただく作品にしようと、さまざまな絹の黒布を配置し、全体のバランスで見せるために白を大きく入れました」と石曾根さん。
左に向けて、カブト虫がいかにも飛び出そうとしている様子なので、その方向に空間をつくり、実物の盆栽を右流れで配置しました。ここに置かれているのは山ぶどうです。作品1でご紹介した「扇面軸」とは異なる雰囲気の空間が生まれています。

次回は8月の予定です。

2019年6月24日月曜日

The June display of Hanging Scroall and Another Bonsai at Takao-komagino-teien

The project "Displaying Hanging Scroll with Bonsai Every Month" has started at Takao-komagino-teien in Tokyo last April. The purpose is to deepen our understanding of Hanging Scroll and explore how to display beautifully with bonsai.

東京・八王子市にある高尾駒木野庭園の古民家で、表装造形家・石曽根和佳子(いしそねわかこ)さんの掛軸が飾られています。石曽根さんの作品に魅了されたYUKIMONO主催者のわたくしが、盆栽と一緒に飾ったら来訪者に喜ばれるのではと、同庭園の盆栽管理者である盆栽家・長沢孝二さんにご相談したことから,
2019年の4月に始まりました。月替わりで、古民家内の床の間2カ所に、掛軸と盆栽を飾っています。

前回、6月1日に掛軸を入れ替えました。今回は添えの盆栽が変わったので、雰囲気の違い見ていただくべく、写真を撮りました。


しもつけ
「風」というモダンな掛軸に、高さのある草物盆栽(しもつけ)が添えられています。サワサワと風にゆらぐ涼し気な風景が広がります。


こちらは「七夕」に合わせた掛軸です。
うっすらとピンクを感じさせる、つくしからまつのふんわりした盆栽が、綾織のかっちりした掛軸と合わさって、空間に柔らかさを添えています。
つくしからまつ

つくしからまつが植えられた鉢の黄色も美しい。アクセントになっていますね。

2019年6月9日日曜日

The June display of Hanging Scroall and Bonsai at Takao-komagino-teien



The project "Displaying Hanging Scroll with Bonsai Every Month" has started at Takao-komagino-teien in Tokyo slast April. The purpose is to deepen our understanding of Hanging Scroll and explore how to display beautifully with bonsai.

On June 1, the Japanese paper craft artist, Wakako Ishisone, the bonsai master, Koji Nagasawa and YUKIMONO gathered in the Tokonoma-room of Takao-komagino-teien. Let's see how we display for June. 

東京・八王子市にある高尾駒木野庭園の古民家で、表装造形家・石曽根和佳子(いしそねわかこ)さんの掛軸が飾られています。石曽根さんの作品に魅了されたYUKIMONO主催者のわたくしが、盆栽と一緒に飾ったら来訪者に喜ばれるのではと、同庭園の盆栽管理者である盆栽家・長沢孝二さんにご相談したことから始まりました。

6月1日の土曜日、6月の飾りのために3人が集いました。試みの第2回目です。今回はどんな掛軸と盆栽がディスプレイされるでしょうか。さっそく拝見していきましょう。(5月の飾りはこちらをご覧くださいませ)




作品その1:七夕  The Star festival

掛軸を広げると、地味だけれどゴージャズな青い布に目が引かれます。江戸時代の古い紋織物の生地で表装されています。錦や綾織りなどに使われた空引機(そらひきばた)で織られた布だろう、と石曾根さん。現在では使われていない織り方だそうです。
七夕をテーマにした和歌が表装されています。少し早いけれど、6月の下旬には、七夕のイベントが高尾駒木野庭園では開催されます。石曾根さんは、季節にちなんだ掛軸を持ってきてくださいました。

和歌は次のように書かれています。
ーーーーーーーーーー
七夕
索餅

誰も今日 身のうきことは索餅を 星空向かえ 君を捧げむ

ーーーーーーーーーー
索餅(さくべい)とは、奈良時代に中国から日本へ伝わってきた小麦粉のお菓子のこと。いろいろ検索して調べたところ、日本では平安時代の頃から、このお菓子を七夕に食べる習慣があったそうです。書かれている和歌の意味はわからないのですが「索餅」を季語に七夕を詠んでいますね。

さまざまな色が重ねられた美しい色紙に、歌がさらさらと書かれています。色紙というと、現代の私たちはサインを書いてもらうときに使う正方形の台紙をイメージしてしまいますが、江戸時代の色紙は薄い紙だったようだと石曾根さんは教えてくださいました。
和歌が書かれた色紙を掛軸に仕立てて床の間に飾ることを昔はしていました。色紙をある程度の大きさに切り、そのままでは小さいので台紙となる白い紙を張ってサイズを調整しました。台貼り表具という方法です。

いったん眺めてみようと、床の間にかけてみました。地のブルーが浮き立つように映えて見えます。天然の素材で染められた布なので、退色しても鮮やかさが残るのでは、と石曾根さんは言います。

長さが少し短めだったことで、別の床の間でも試してみることにしました。
すっきり収まった感じがします。7月7日まで、この掛軸はここで飾られることになりました。


作品その2:風     Winds
ほかにも、石曾根さんが持ってきてくださった作品を拝見していきましょう。こちらは、書家の方が書かれた「風」という文字があしらわれた掛軸です。
従来の掛軸の形式から離れ、コンテンポラリーな印象を受ける作品です。
上部から2本、銀色の細長い布が垂れ下がっています。これは風帯(ふうたい)と呼びます。石曾根さんが銀地に墨色をのせて渋く仕上げたそうですが、このシルバーの帯2本が、ビシッと決めてくれている感じがします。

少し、飾り方を試してみることにしました。いかにも盆栽らしい盆栽と、コンテンポラリーな掛軸は、案外が合うのではないでしょうか……
……と思ったのですが、うーん、もう少し盆栽が小さいとよいのか……いえ、サイズの問題というより、どちらも造形として完成しているため、主張し合ってちょっと喧嘩してしまって見えます。
長沢さんが、やや大きめな草物の盆栽を置きました。このくらいのほうがよいのかな。
くさものがさり気なく配置され、「風」の掛軸が引き立って見えます。
作品性の高いユニークな掛軸ですが、床の間にかっこよく収まりました。くさものの盆栽が添えられることで、品の良い空間がつくられています。
10時から始めて、どこに何をどう飾るかを決めるまで、今日はおよそ2時間半をかけました。持ってきていただいた作品をどのような素材で表装されたのか、掛軸そのものの解説、飾り方、組み合わせ方についての考えなど、石曾根さんと長沢さんのお話は、ずっと続きます。掛軸と盆栽にかかわる勉強会に参加させていただいた気分です。

掛軸と盆栽を飾る試みについて、ここまでご覧いただきありがとうございました。次回は7月13日に実施します。




















2019年4月27日土曜日

The display of Hanging Scroall and Bonsai at Takao-komagino-teien on April


The new project "Displaying Hanging Scroll with Bonsai" started at Takao-komagino-teien in Tokyo. The artist, Ms.Wakako Ishisone who creats Hanging Scrolls and the bonsai master, Koji Nagasawa and YUKIMONO took part in this project. The purpose is to deepen our understanding of Hanging Scroll and explore how to display beautifully with bonsai.   

東京・八王子市にある高尾駒木野庭園の古民家で、表装造形家・石曽根和佳子(いしそねわかこ)さんの掛け軸が飾られています。石曽根さんの掛け軸に魅了されたYUKIMONO主催者のわたしが、盆栽と一緒に飾ったら来訪者に喜ばれるのではと、同庭園の盆栽管理者である盆栽家・長沢孝二さんにご相談したことから始まりました。
4月27日の土曜日、初めて3人が集いました。これから月替わりで、掛け軸と盆栽のコラボレーションを進めていく予定です。では今回の掛け軸を見ていきましょう。


作品その1:「兜」 Samurai Warrior Helmet  
藁と柏の葉で作られた兜が描かれた絵を、石曽根さんが袋表装した掛け軸です。端午の節句を前に、この季節に合う作品を石曽根さんが持参してくださいました。
絵の天地と風帯に銀箔を施したことで、民芸調の柔らかな絵がビシッと格式高く見えます。絵の下に「幸雨筆」のサインが見えます。描かれたのは、大正から昭和のはじめくらいに東北地方に住んでいた方だそうです。

掛け軸の下に付いている円筒のおもりのようなものを「軸先(じくさき)」と呼びます。石、鉄、漆塗りの木、陶、ガラスなどで作られるそうです。こちらは、細かい線が施された陶製の軸先です。味がありますね。

床の間に飾ってみました。いかがでしょうか。この兜の掛け軸は、作品自体に存在感があるため、長沢さんは、あえて盆栽と合わせない判断をしました。


「香炉を下に置けたら……」と長沢さん。あいにく香炉はなかったので、かわりに小さな人形が置かれています。



作品その2:「竹に雀」 Sparrows in bamboos
江戸小紋柄と、竹に寄り添う雀の絵柄。石曽根さんが、江戸時代の古い着物の布を使って作った掛け軸です。絵をよく見ると、雀の羽、竹の葉の一枚いちまいが、とても細かく描かれています。

こちら、よくご覧になってください。鹿の子模様と縞模様の市松柄になっていますね。これ、最初に見たときは、こういう柄の一枚の布だと思ったのですが、違うのです。石曽根さんが、それぞれ柄の異なる江戸小紋の布を市松に組み合わせて仕立てたものなのです。「一枚の布を使ってもよかったけれど、これを作った当時は、柄の異なる布を使って自分で市松柄を作ることに熱中していた」と石曽根さん。とても手の込んだ作品です。


この掛け軸はサイズも小さいので、控えめに飾りました。

シダの盆栽を添えています。なぜ、このくさもの盆栽を置いたのでしょうか?
掛け軸の「竹に雀」の絵をよく見てみると、竹の下に小さな草が生えています。その草のイメージをこの盆栽に託しています。シダを置いたことで、掛け軸の絵がさらに広がり、一つの景色が床の間に表現されています。

Japanese Craft Artist, Wakako Ishisone
表装造形家の石曽根さんです。掛け軸や屏風をたくさん作られています。石曽根さんの作品に盆栽を添えることで、美しい空間を創り出せないかとYUKIMONOは模索しています。

Bonsai Master, Koji Nagasawa
左が盆栽家の長沢さんです。石曽根さんと長沢さんのやりとりを聞いていると、盆栽と表装の奥深い世界が無限に広がっていきます。

※こちらは別の日のものセッコクが添えられています。ピンクの花が加わって、空間がやわらかい雰囲気になりました。(5月5日撮影)


高尾駒木野庭園です。屋外にはたくさんの盆栽が飾られています。東京都内で唯一、無料でゴージャスな盆栽を鑑賞できる場所。高尾駅から徒歩15分くらいの場所にあります。ぜひ足をお運びくださいませ。



※石曽根さんの表装作品(掛け軸や屏風など)を見ることができる展示会が、5/2-5に飯田橋で開催されます。「小さな宇宙展~小品盆栽と鉢・小さな和紙と表装の世界」
場所はこちらです。




2017年8月16日水曜日

Met the New Potter Gassan in Kyoto

Hello, I am Yuki, an owner of the Japanese bonsai pots online store YUKIMONO.

Last week I could meet a potter that I wanted to see. 
He is Takao Nagata and his professional name as a potter is Gassan(月山).
He was born and raised Kyoto.

He opened his kiln in Kyoto in 1990 and has been making Japanese traditional pottery called Kiyomizu-yaki. His mail work is tableware, however sometimes he makes bonsai pots with technique of Kiyomizu-yaki and create wonderful pieces.


Thank you for reading YUKIMONO blog post!